Civil War Diary: Company G, 147th P.V.I.

Preface

The History of Company G, 147th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry during the American Civil War (September, 1862 through June, 1865) By Sgt Michael S. Schroyer

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The Company is Organized

CHAPTER 1
The only company of Civil War soldiers credited to Snyder county that was sworn in for three years in that terrible war between the North and the South.

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Camp Simmons

CHAPTER 2
We were placed in A tents, in messes of four in a tent, with a board floor four inches above the ground and on it a good bunch of straw.

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Burying Samuel P. Mullen

CHAPTER 6
On the 12th of March we buried with military honors Samuel P. Mullen. I think it was the most solemn funeral I had attended up to that time.

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In Camp at Dumphries

CHAPTER 8
In our Dumphries camp the first thing in the morning was reveille at 6:00 o’clock. At 6:30 roll call by our orderly, Sergeant B. T. Parks.

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Camp Food

CHAPTER 9
It might be interesting to know just what we received from Uncle Sam, to keep us in fighting trim.

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The Battle of Chancellorsville

CHAPTER 11
Fighting began this morning about 4 o’clock. Stonewall Jackson’s troops attacked the 11th Corps commanded by General O. O. Howard, in front, and flank. Fighting was severe.

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In Camp at Aquia Creek

CHAPTER 13
When we reached this camp north of the river, the drum corps of the different regiments gave us martial music, and the bugles sounded forth their beautiful calls. Every soldier in camp cheered.

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Happenings in Camp

CHAPTER 15
General Green’s daughter was sitting in a barouche and enjoying the movements of the troops. She said to the General: “Papa make them trot again. I like to see them trot.”

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More Marching

CHAPTER 16
We were called upon to witness the execution of William Gruver and William McKee. These lads were from Lewistown, Pa. They were arrested June 4th for desertion to the enemy.

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Marching to Gettysburg

CHAPTER 18
Tuesday, June 30th, broke camp, passed thru Taneytown and shortly came to a tree upon which was posted, “Line between Pennsylvania and Maryland.”

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The Gettysburg Campaign

CHAPTER 19
We were relieved this morning by the Berdan Sharpshooters and taken past General Meade’s headquarters to the kettle back of Culp’s Hill on the right of our line.

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Gettysburg Aftermath

CHAPTER 22
People from all sections of the country came on horseback, afoot and in carriages to visit the battlefield. Hundreds had gathered.

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In Camp at Gettysburg

CHAPTER 23
While lying in camp here the writer went to town to have a few cakes baked. We soon found a place where a lady was doing some baking for the soldiers.

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Camping at Harper’s Ferry

CHAPTER 24
We marched in three States today: Maryland, West Virginia and old Virginia. When we entered Harper’s Ferry, the boys soon smelled in the air that a bakery was not far off.

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Marching Toward Kelly’s Ford

CHAPTER 26
The Rebel cavalry of course advanced. Our skirmishers kept quiet and got down into the high grass. Johnny Reb’s surprise was so complete that they about faced and skedaddled.

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Hot Day of Marching

CHAPTER 27
On the march we were not permitted (no matter how hot the weather was) to take off our coats, but had to have them buttoned up to the neck.

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In Camp at Ellis’ Ford

CHAPTER 28
Some boys played cards and carried a deck, but whenever a battle was imminent, would throw the decks away. It was not the right thing to be found dead with a deck of cards in a pocket

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Shooting of Two Deserters

CHAPTER 29
Two more souls were ushered into eternity by the mandate of the cruel war. After witnessing the shooting or murdering of these men we changed our mind as to capital punishment.

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In Camp at Duck River

CHAPTER 33
We were sitting around the fire of the camp reserve post, when the Colonel of this Tennessee regiment with several of his men came to converse with us.

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A Helpful Scout

CHAPTER 34
He pulled up his pantleg and from under the lining of his boot he handed over a lot of papers, which were passes from General Bragg and other Confederate Generals in the area.

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Near Lookout Mountain

CHAPTER 36
Every morning when day would break upon us we could see old Lookout Mountain, just a short distance away, with the Rebel signal corps on its summit.

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The Battle of Lookout Mountain

CHAPTER 37
The first thing we did upon taking our position was to arrange with the Rebels that neither side would shoot, as it was impossible to settle the war at that particular time and place.

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Battle Above the Clouds

CHAPTER 38
The night spent on Lookout Mountain, clinging to its rocky side in a cold, drizzling November rain will never be forgotten by those who were participants in that great battle.

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Stories from the Battles

CHAPTER 41
While leading our brigade into action he was near his old regiment when the Colonel and Lieutenant Colonel Crane both got up on a rock, flapped their arms and crowed.

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Back at Camp Starvation

CHAPTER 42
Mouldy crackers were thrown into the horse troughs, and the soldiers would pick out the little broken pieces that were not mouldy and eat them with relish.

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Down the River on a Boat

CHAPTER 46
450 men with eight pieces of artillery having been detailed to make the trip down the river were loaded on this boat, in the afternoon we left with General Geary in command.

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A Toad in My Coffee

CHAPTER 48
When he came back to get his coffee, imagine his surprise to find that in his absence a large toad had jumped into his coffee cup and was laying on his back spread out.

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Battle of New Hope Church

CHAPTER 49
General Hooker placed himself just in rear of Company G and drawing his sword said: “This line can’t break unless it goes thru me first.”

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On the Road to Marrietta

CHAPTER 51
As the time set for the assault was drawing near, there was a gloomy foreboding that before the setting of the sun many of us would have answered our last roll call.

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A Mysterious Rider

CHAPTER 52
In the afternoon a man wearing a black hat, high top boots, and a gum poncho over him, and mounted on a black horse, came from our rear along the run.

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Skirmishing on the Way to Kennesaw

CHAPTER 53
A loaded train of cars came to Big Shanty, the locomotive detached, was run forward to a water tank within range of the enemy’s guns on Kennesaw, when the enemy opened fire on the locomotive.

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The Battle of Atlanta

CHAPTER 54
The move towards the city was now on in earnest. The entire army was now over the river, and “On to Atlanta” was the cry.

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Siege of Atlanta

CHAPTER 55
In reply to our 32-lb cannon shells the Rebels would drop a gentle reminder (64-lb shells) into our camp, which would create quite a stir.

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Lincoln Wins Election

CHAPTER 57
Politics now were getting hot. Lincoln, Republican, and McClellan, Democrat, were candidates for president. Many were the discussions around the camp fires.

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The Burning of Atlanta

CHAPTER 58
The torch was applied by a force of men detailed for that purpose, the black smoke rising high in the air, and hanging like a pall over the once beautiful, but now doomed city.

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Leaving Atlanta

CHAPTER 59
As we looked back from our camp at Stone Mountain we could still see the great columns of smoke, arising from the burning city Atlanta. This all seemed hard but it was war, and war to the finish.

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The Condition of Slaves

CHAPTER 61
We cannot realize the heart aches and fears when father or mother was separated from their families. These poor slaves could not realize what freedom was.

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Stories Along the March

CHAPTER 62
At the crossing of a large swamp an alligator was killed, which was said to have measured 10 feet. The Company boys went to see him.

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Arrival at Savannah

CHAPTER 63
General Sherman entered the city and rode down Bull Street. Company G can well feel proud of the humble part they took in the capture of the city of Savannah.

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In Camp at Savannah

CHAPTER 64
A large bakery was opened by a Dutchman on McCallister street, and this bread was sold, baked in one pan, sixteen loaves for one dollar.

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Leaving Savannah

CHAPTER 65
We left the city with banners flying, bands playing and the men everywhere cheering and all seeming anxious to cross the Savannah river into South Carolina, the hotbed of secession.

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Marching to Richmond

CHAPTER 69
After leaving Raleigh, N. C., and marching toward Richmond we met hundreds of Confederates. They all looked very much distressed, and presented a very pitiable sight.

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Marching to Washington

CHAPTER 70
Today we marched upon the battlefield at Chancellorsville, where just two years and twelve days before Company G was engaged in the first battle of the service.

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Back Home in Selinsgrove

CHAPTER 73
As we rounded the Island we saw a great crowd of men, women and children upon the bank of the west side of the river, cheering and anxiously awaiting our coming.

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